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raising healthy eaters - kids eating healthy
Raising Healthy Eaters – Tips to Help Parents and Educators

How to raise healthy eaters

Tips and strategies to get our children excited about healthy eating and easy way to instil healthy eating habits in kids

It’s a common topic of discussion among parents – what their kids do and don’t eat.  Picky eaters are not due to poor parenting; many good parents have children who prefer junk food.  What can be done to help our children grow up as healthy eaters?

Serve Healthy Food

Sounds obvious right?  But when a child doesn’t like a food, it’s often easier to just not serve it to them.  Make a point of always providing fruit, vegetables and healthy proteins with their meals at home and lunches for school.  Encourage them to try “just a bite”.

A study done in 2010 showed that kids who tried a vegetable that they didn’t like 8 or 9 times began to then like it more.  It takes time to develop a taste for food – but with each try, they’ll get closer to liking it more. MyPlate Food Guide and  Canada’s Food Guide provide direction for having healthy and balanced food intake.

Improve Nutrition

According to Dr. Claire McCarthy of Harvard Health Publishing, “Make sure half their calories are from “good” carbohydrates, such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.  Healthy eaters need to limit highly processed carbohydrates, such as cookies, cakes, sodas, and chips.  Keep healthy snacks, such as yoghurt, fruits, and vegetables, on hand instead of high-fat, high-sodium foods.”

Control unhealthy amounts of unnecessary calorie intake.  Eat minimal fast food.  Provide water and low-fat milk for beverages and limit sodas and other drinks that are high in sugar.  Be mindful when you’re shopping – if junk food is not in the house, they (and you!) can’t snack on it.

Be aware of how you talk about food

We tend to talk about “good food” and “bad food”.  But then when we eat “bad” food, what does that say about us?  Treats and junk food will always be a part of special events, celebrations or holidays.  Having a “good” or “bad” association with food doesn’t help us with our feelings around food.  Of course, the goal is to have an overall healthy diet, but try changing the focus of your conversations around food. It would be encouraging and helpful for the young healthy eaters to hear more about healthy choices and reasonable amounts instead of good and bad.

Involve your children with food

Take your children grocery shopping and include them in making healthy selections.  Of course, they’ll want every treat in the store, but let them select apples that they think look nice or pick out a new vegetable to try with dinner.  Have your healthy eaters help in the kitchen with food preparation.

It’s a way to spend and enjoy time together, they’ll learn important cooking skills and they’ll have a better understanding of the food they eat.  You can even grow food together!  Have them pick out seeds to plant in the garden and then enjoy the harvest.  All of these things can make healthy eating an enjoyable and shared experience.

Start Early

A study presented at the annual meeting of The Obesity Society showed that the obesity epidemic is ingrained with poor eating habits that began between the ages of 12 and 24 months.  Babies need to learn to listen to their own hunger cues and parents forcing them to finish a bottle can confuse that.

Early eaters who are given vegetables and fruits regularly will think of them as normal foods rather than ones they’re forced to eat.  Be mindful of how those early meals set them up to eat for years to come.

Avoid using food as a reward or punishment

Food has three key roles: nutrition, social engagement and emotional input.  We eat to survive by consuming nutrients.  We eat while we engage socially with others, during holidays and for special occasions.  We also eat because it provides pleasure.

Using food to reward good behaviour or punish poor behaviour creates confusion around food.  It might work to alter behaviour in the short term, but in the long term, it creates a function around food that is unhealthy.

It’s not just about food

Eating healthy is important, but health is also about exercise, rest, less screen time and more family time.  School-aged kids should be getting a minimum of 30 to 60 minutes of physical activity on most days.  Be a role model and get moving regularly yourself.  Help your child get enough rest but enforcing set bed and wakeup times, cutting caffeine intake and ensuring they get 8-9 hours of sleep per night.

TV, computers, tablets and videos games contribute to a sedentary lifestyle.  When at a screen, children’s metabolism slows while their appetites increase.  Eat together as a family, interact and engage with one another over the meal.  This provides an opportunity to demonstrate healthy eating yourself while maintaining positive relationships among the family members.

Get Support

Sometimes creative methods may be needed and advice from a professional can help.  Speak with your family doctor if, despite your best efforts, your child’s diet needs expanding.  If you personally have an unhealthy relationship with food, get support so you can feel confident in fostering your child’s relationship with eating.

For more suggestions and guidance around nutrition and healthy eating, visit the government of Canada’s webpage for Food and Nutrition.

Check out Little Food Lovers, a free e-book series dedicated to family-friendly recipes and snack and meal ideas, as well as lifestyle tips and strategies designed to get your kids excited about healthy eating!

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Healthy tips for children - healthy sleep routine
Creating a Healthy Sleep Routine

A healthy sleep routine is essential at any age.

A bedtime routine eases the transition from being awake to being asleep. With calming, comforting activities, your child will feel more secure and ready for bed. Sleep associations are strong, and with consistent use, your child will come to expect the routine, making bedtime transitions easier for everyone. A child’s sleep routine can be simple as long as it is consistent and predictable. Your child’s bedtime routine will change as they age, but the basics should stay the same. Quick and easy or long and relaxing, it’s your choice what you do to make your child ready for bed.

Developing a sleep routine for your child is easy: simply choose a few calming activities that will help your child wind down before bed. It can be as simple as putting on pajamas, brushing teeth, going to the bathroom, and reading a story, or you can involve bathtime, snuggling, songs, or even massage. Follow these tips to build the perfect bedtime routine for you and your child, adjusting activities for age as necessary:

  • Set a consistent bedtime: Your child’s body will learn to get ready to sleep at a certain time if you stick to a consistent bedtime, making the transition to bed easier.
  • Tell your child bedtime is approaching: Give your child a warning that you’ll be starting bedtime in a few minutes. If they’re playing, suggest they get “one more time” and then it’s off to start your routine.
  • Stop screen time: Screen time should end at least 30 minutes before bed. Do not allow screen time in your child’s bedroom and especially not in bed.
  • Limit food and drink: Avoid giving your child food or drink just before bed, and don’t send your child to bed with a drink, especially milk, formula, or juice, which can cause cavities as they sit on teeth all night. If they insist on a drink, give them water.
  • Brush teeth and use the potty: While you’re running bath water, encourage your child to use the potty and brush his or her teeth, offering assistance if necessary.
  • Start a warm bath: A warm bath will raise your child’s body temperature slightly and induce sleepiness. Plus, they can keep playing for a few more minutes with bath toys.
  • Put on pajamas: Help your child dress for bed in comfortable pajamas. If they are old enough, encourage them to choose which pajamas they’d like to wear.
  • Choose a comfort item: If your child sleeps with a special blanket or toy, ask them to choose which item they’d like to take to bed.
  • Keep bedtime in your child’s bedroom: Once your bedtime routine has begun, keep it all in your child’s sleep environment. Avoid adult bedrooms or trips to the kitchen or living room for snacks or toys once you’ve gone into their room.
  • Read a story, sing a song, say a prayer: Enjoy a few minutes of bonding over a favourite bedtime book, especially ones with a bedtime theme. Lullabies and prayers or yoga and meditation are also a good option during this time.
  • Put your child to bed: Take a few minutes to snuggle or talk about your day if you’d like. Encourage children to fall asleep on their own by saying goodnight and leaving while they are still awake.
  • Stay consistent: Whatever elements you choose to make part of your bedtime routine, stick with them. Keeping the same routine every night makes it easier for your child to settle into bed, giving his or her body cues that it’s about time to go to sleep. Avoid wavering on bedtime rules to cut down on stalling.

For more information om understanding kids’ sleep needs, visit Sleep Help, a great resource devoted to spreading awareness of sleep health and wellness.

 

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